From L to R: Douglas McIldoon; Professor Christine Liddell, University of Ulster; Paul Wallace, NEA NI; Michael Donnelly; Katie Pilkington, Bryson Energy; Nigel Brady, Bryson Energy; Pat Austin, NEA NI; Chris Morris, Ulaidh Research Consulting and Ursula Toman, Bryson Energy.

From L to R: Douglas McIldoon; Professor Christine Liddell, University of Ulster; Paul Wallace, NEA NI; Michael Donnelly; Katie Pilkington, Bryson Energy; Nigel Brady, Bryson Energy; Pat Austin, NEA NI; Chris Morris, Ulaidh Research Consulting and Ursula Toman, Bryson Energy.

As part of ongoing efforts to tackle fuel poverty, which affects 42% of the population in Northern Ireland, Bryson Energy, the University of Ulster and the Oak Foundation commissioned research into the benefits and implications of removing old inefficient oil heating systems across Northern Ireland. A local statistician Dr Chris Morris was tasked to undertake the research and compile a report outlining the findings.

On 23rd September 2014 The Morris Report: “Transforming Northern Ireland’s Heating Systems: A Plan to Retrofit Dwellings” was presented to delegates at the Fuel Poverty Coalition Progress Event which was held in the NICVA building.

Nigel Brady, Director of Bryson Energy, discusses:

“We have a unique fuel poverty problem in Northern Ireland which needs a local solution. The use of home heating oil is one of the key drivers of fuel poverty here in Northern Ireland, which affects 42% of the population. The Morris Report provides us with an analysis of local data and evidence that we can use as the basis for developing a road map specific to addressing Northern Ireland circumstances.”

Professor Christine Liddell of the University of Ulster adds:

“The report highlights that we need radical energy reform that will rejuvenate houses and neighbourhoods; generate significant energy savings; provide new jobs and training opportunities, and improve the health and wellbeing of tens of thousands of people. We have sufficient local understanding, local expertise and local data available to be in a position to produce a plan that fits the Northern Ireland context.”

The Morris Report aims to inform:

  • housing and related policies in Northern Ireland
  • forward planning and the economic implications of retrofitting housing throughout the region
  • how housing regeneration can be most cost-effectively implemented in a program of mass retrofit and rejuvenation of the existing housing stock
  • the public understanding of how fuel poverty can be ameliorated through investments in the fabric of their home.

Pat Austin, Chair of the Fuel Poverty Coalition said:

“The lack of a co-ordinated approach from Government to the fuel poverty crisis is totally unacceptable. Our Coalition has been working over the past year to start to develop actions required to tackle the issue head on. To date our calls for a costed action plan setting out how and when fuel poverty will be eradicated has fallen on deaf ears but the foresight of Bryson Energy and the Oak Foundation to commission this work has set down a marker to help us measure the interventions required. By sharing this research and discussing findings from the FPC working groups, we can shape the next steps required to progress action.”

If you wish to access the Retrofit Report Intro (Liddell) please click HERE. If you wish to access the Retrofit Report – Main Report (Morris) please click HERE.

If you would like more information The Morris Report, please contact Katie Pilkington at Bryson Energy on 028 9073 4284 or via email to kpilkington@brysonenergy.org.

Bryson Energy is part of the Bryson Charitable Group, Northern Ireland’s leading social enterprise.